Dreamland: Inside the Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The park sits quiet in the early morning as the first visitors are beginning to trickle in from Surf Avenue. A rocket ride can be seen in the foreground, while the Atlantic stretches into the distance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The miniature railroad in Dreamland was built by Cagney Brothers Miniature Railway Company. According to Richard Snow’s book Coney Island: A Postcard Journey to the City of Fire, they were powerful enough to pull ten tons at ten m.p.h. Dreamland kept with the traditional 4-4-0 steam engines, while Luna got new electric engines, certainly a park ahead of its time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Located at the end of Dreamland’s pier, the Ballroom was a beautiful sight for all visitors. It offered one of the most beautiful views of the ocean by day and during nighttime thousands of lights enchanted couples as they sauntered across the floor. (Photo Courtesy Library of Congress)

 

 

 

 

 

While the postcard says Steeplechase, this is clearly Dreamland, or just outside of it.  It is difficult to ascertain whether this is taken from the edge of the park and the Ferris wheel was an independent concession or if it was part of the park.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fighting Flames was one of the rides that most directly copied from Luna Park, where it was called Fire and Flames. The same idea prevailed here: tenements were set and the fire department of New York came to rescue the trapped victims, some of whom had to jump down into nets to escape the blaze. This was one of the attractions with which New Yorkers identified most, since many lived in badly-kept and run down dwellings where fire was always a concern. Note the splash pool for the Chutes to the left. (Photo Courtesy the Library of Congress)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fighting Flames was one of the rides that most directly copied from Luna Park, where it was called Fire and Flames. The same idea prevailed here: tenements were set and the fire department of New York came to rescue the trapped victims, some of whom had to jump down into nets to escape the blaze. This was one of the attractions with which New Yorkers identified most, since many lived in badly-kept and run down dwellings where fire was always a concern. Note the splash pool for the Chutes to the left. (Photo Courtesy the Library of Congress)

 

 

 

 

The back of Dreamland. Left to right we have: the pool of the chutes, the Iron Tower (out of the park), Touring the Alps, the Japanese Tea Room and the beach (out of picture).